You fell and got hurt while you were at a friend’s house. You didn’t want to go to the hospital, but the swelling and pain were more than enough that you knew you’d need something stronger than the ibuprofen you had in your cabinet. 

Against your better judgment, you went online and asked your friends on social media if anyone had anything stronger. Someone you weren’t familiar with messaged you and said they had some you could buy. At that point, you were in a fair amount of pain, so you agreed to buy the medication from them if you could get somewhere to meet them. 

Once you arrived at the shop where you agreed to meet, you had the cash ready to make the exchange. Unfortunately, that friendly party wasn’t someone you should have tried to buy from, because they were a police officer. Now, you’re accused of trying to buy illegal drugs. You feel like you were set up, even if you were the one asking for drugs from others. 

Cases like this are tricky, because officers have to stay on the right side of the law. They can’t entice you to buy or encourage you to buy if you decide not to do so. They shouldn’t do anything that essentially entraps you, because that’s against the law. 

In North Carolina, you can face significant penalties for buying a prescription drug without a prescription or for bypassing your doctor to get medications on the street. Our website has more information on what you should do if you’ve broken the law because you will want to build a strong defense to protect yourself from serious consequences.